CARU Recommends Jakks Modify Advertising For ‘Eyeclops’ Goggles To Better Depict Adult Supervision

New York, NY – August 10, 2009 – The Children’s Advertising Review Unit of the Council of Better Business Bureaus (CARU) has recommended that JAKKS Pacific modify television advertising for “Eyeclops Night Vision Goggles”  to better depict adult supervision.

Television advertising for the product came to the attention of CARU – the children’s advertising industry’s self-regulatory forum – through CARU’s ongoing monitoring practices. The commercial appeared during children’s programming.

CARU strives to assure that advertising directed to children is truthful and accurate, and that it conveys the appropriate safety message when children are shown participating in activities that present the risk of harm. The advertising at issue depicts three boys, two of whom are wearing the Goggles, sneaking up on an older sister who is standing near a balcony and a staircase. The boys turn out the light, startling their sister.

The commercial then depicts the boys sneaking up on their father, who is working in the family garage. The boys turn out the light, but find that their father is wearing a pair of Goggles. The closing shot shows the product and the accompanying voice-over that states, “Adult supervision required.”

The Goggles are powered by infra-red driven night vision technology. Both the product packaging and the product Website include the following language:

“WARNING: ADULT SUPERVISION REQUIRED. . .”

Upon its review of the advertising, CARU questioned whether the advertiser adequately depicted the need for adult supervision in the commercial and whether representations of the boys turning off the lights was behavior that might pose a safety risk.

The advertiser contended that the commercial depicted “meaningful and adequate adult supervision and participation” in play.

Following its review of the advertising, CARU determined that the commercial at issue did not adequately depict adult supervision and recommended the company modify the broadcast ad.

Jakks, in its advertiser’s statement, said the company has “always has fully respected and supported both CARU’s mission and its Core Principles and Guidelines when developing our commercials.”

The company noted that it disagreed with CARU’s findings, but said it would “continue to develop and refine our rigorous commercial development review process which seeks to follow these Core Principles and the Guidelines.  We will carefully consider CARU’s guidance related to this particular commercial as we continuously strive to produce fully compliant commercials in the future.”